This You Run Like A Girl Instagram Account Is The Encouragement And Love Every Woman Needs

Instagram / @yourunlikeagirl

What does it mean to run ‘like a girl,’ to scream ‘like a girl,’ to act ‘like a girl’? If you’re anything like me, you’ve heard that phrase before – and whether spoken with malice or innocence, there’s something about it that just doesn’t sit well. Regardless of the implication, it’s a negative stereotype. It’s a way of separating the sexes. It’s a way of undercutting the strength and power that possesses, just by existing on this earth.

And contemporary feminism pushes back against that phrase, disregarding all negativity and saying, instead, that to be ‘like a girl’ is to be confident, resilient, brilliant and strong.

In an Instagram account, @yourunlikeagirl, creator and compiler Nadia Addesi gathers empowering stories from women, sharing what the phrase means to them in their personal struggles, journeys, and lives.

Here are a few of the posts:

1. Moa

My name is Moa and I live in Sweden with my mum and sister. I am 19 years old and I have Down Syndrome. When my mom was pregnant with me, she was not able to take the tests that are available today.  She had a feeling that something wasn't right, but everyone assured her that it was. My mom loves me and is so happy that I came into her life. She trained me a lot, When I was a little girl, she taught me to use sign language as a way to communicate. I like to act, I go to a theatre group on Mondays and I always have a great time there. In September I went to a theatre camp in Portugal. One thing I am proud of is that I was in an exhibition called Icons. There were 21 different models with down syndrome who each portrayed a different icon in history. I have the portrait of me at home and I just love it, I am so proud. I use my Instagram account to impact the view on Down Syndrome. For parents, relatives and everybody else to see there is nothing more perfect. I stay positive and focused just by living my life on my own terms. Doing things I like makes me happy and that keeps me going. I don't worry about what other people think because I am perfect just the way I am and my life is perfect just the way I live it. I want to show the world that Down Syndrome is UP Syndrome. From me to all you young girls and women out there, You are perfect just the way you are!

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“I don’t worry about what other people think because I am perfect just the way I am and my life is perfect just the way I live it. I want to show the world that Down Syndrome is UP Syndrome. From me to all you young girls and women out there, You are perfect just the way you are!”

2. Lillian Martinez

I'm Lillian Martinez, I was born without the lower part of my left hand. I am a very friendly and outgoing person that loves to have fun. Hiking is something I started doing to relax while in school and that has brought me a lot of joy over the past few years. The views at the top of any mountain and the feeling of accomplishing the end goal is what makes the trails so worth it no matter how hard it was getting to the top. As a kid with one arm growing up wasn't all that bad. I did my own things and minded my own business and really didn't seem to care what anyone thought of me in an innocent way. However, it wasn't until i was in middle school that I started to see how rude some of the kids were to me. And so to avoid rude comments, stares an dumb questions I decided to just hide my arm in every way possible. I know this is not the best solution but younger me didn't know better. I continued to heavily hide my arm in high school and only those close to me knew about it. It was hard and all of that added unnecessary stress in my life. I would always opt out of sports that required two hands such as softball or basketball because I thought It was "too hard" and "embarrassing." It wasn't until my junior year in college when I started to really think things through and went on a path of self love. I started meeting people that didn't care about me being different, but they cared about who I was on the inside and that really helped me over come some of my fears. Surrounding yourself with peers that push you to be a better you can do wonders. I'm still working on loving myself, but I'm definitely stronger and more confident now than I was a few years ago. I don't really care what others think or say. It's all about discovering who you are and loving yourself and all of your imperfections. Life is about being happy. Don't waste your time paying attention to the haters but instead pay attention to what makes you smile!

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“I’m still working on loving myself, but I’m definitely stronger and more confident now than I was a few years ago. I don’t really care what others think or say. It’s all about discovering who you are and loving yourself and all of your imperfections. Life is about being happy. Don’t waste your time paying attention to the haters but instead pay attention to what makes you smile!”

3. Angie Ardolf

Throughout October, @angieandruby have been “filling buckets" through kind acts whenever they get the chance, to spread more love and happiness in their little corner of the world. ______________________ My name is Angela (Angie) Ardolf and I am a single momma to my beautiful daughter Ruby. She is 12 years old and has a rare genetic condition called Stromme Syndrome, which causes microcephaly (small brain), vision impairment and intestinal issues. Apparently, there are only 12 cases of this syndrome in the world! Despite doctors making dire predictions about Ruby's future, she has surpassed every single prediction made about her.  I got pregnant at the age of 22, fresh out of college and so excited for my future. I was not at all prepared to be a mom, but I knew that I had been given a gift and it was my role in life to care for this child. When I discovered that she would be born with disabilities, I was beside myself with grief and pain. So many people gathered around me to show me love and support, which helped me through those difficult early days. Seeing my daughter's beautiful face and watching her fight to become the person she is today has kept me going in my darkest hours. Don't ever let anything stand in your way of becoming who and what you want to be. You are the only person who knows what is best for you, and you have infinite strength and wisdom within! Tap into what makes your heart sing and you will be led exactly where you need to be. Also, be nice to every single person you meet. You never know who could have the key to the door you've been wishing would open.

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“Don’t ever let anything stand in your way of becoming who and what you want to be. You are the only person who knows what is best for you, and you have infinite strength and wisdom within! Tap into what makes your heart sing and you will be led exactly where you need to be. Also, be nice to every single person you meet. You never know who could have the key to the door you’ve been wishing would open.”

4. Lexie Manion

My name is Lexie Manion. As a woman, I feel so much pressure to look put together and well-dressed every single day. As a plus size woman, I feel that pressure even more so than when I was a straight size. I think part of that is because there are plus size women out there who have hid their bodies under baggy clothes for long periods of time – whether it be because we were ashamed to show our bodies or because we didn't have access to clothes we like that fit. 
Another part of this reasoning is because people judge. I already have a strike against me for going out in public as a fat person; I'm looked down upon and shamed. And I get another strike if I'm not dressed well. 
This world cares so much about image, so sometimes we have to conform to the pressures.

Because as a woman, if I'm not wearing makeup, I'm told I look 'sick' and 'tired', and maybe even 'ugly'. As a woman, if I'm wearing a simple and comfy outfit, I'm not 'trying hard enough'. As a plus size woman, if I'm wearing comfy clothes, I'm seen as 'not trying hard enough' too, but even more so because I'm fat. In many people's eyes, fat equals lazy/unhealthy/gross. So it's another strike of judgment when I'm not putting all my effort into that day's look. And especially now that I have embraced my body as a fat person, people also expect me to ALWAYS be wearing risqué clothing. 
I'm here to tell you to eff the rules. If you want to wear something baggy (I do for comfort or on days I don't want to stand out), you are no less confident or worthy. You don't HAVE to always look like a 10. What matters is that you feel like a 10, or that you are working towards that number (because you deserve to feel good about yourself!). We may have days we don't want to wear makeup, or form fitting clothing, or more risqué outfits. That doesn't mean that we hate ourselves or that we were faking being confident all along. It just means whatever because it simply doesn't matter. Confidence isn't just how we look; it can also be seen in how we speak, and in how we treat ourselves and others.

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“You don’t HAVE to always look like a 10. What matters is that you feel like a 10, or that you are working towards that number (because you deserve to feel good about yourself!). We may have days we don’t want to wear makeup, or form fitting clothing, or more risqué outfits. That doesn’t mean that we hate ourselves or that we were faking being confident all along. It just means whatever because it simply doesn’t matter. Confidence isn’t just how we look; it can also be seen in how we speak, and in how we treat ourselves and others.”

5. Hülya Durmaz

Hi, I’m Hülya Durmaz from Germany. I was born with deformed hands and legs in 1983. I spent most of my life until I was six years old in and out of hospitals having more than 20 operations. Finally the doctors were able to fix my legs and I walked until I was 18 when some of the screws the doctors had to put in to fix my bones got infected and I was left battling sepsis. In order to save my life, the doctors had to amputate both of my legs above the knee and I was left with short stumps. I think it is important that people start seeing beauty not as a concept but as something which can be seen in all of us. I do realize that seeing a woman with only half a body, seeing scars, leg stumps and deformed hands is not considered beautiful. But this isn't the point, beauty lies in the fact that me and thousands of other people out there do not hide their weaknesses but show that this is nothing to be ashamed about. Beauty does not lie in scars or missing limbs but in the self confidence to be able to show these scars and be happy with who you are in this world. I never had any issues being the "legless girl with the strange hands". I just lived my live. Did my school, college, always have been a fulltime worker, lived independently. Of course I take longer to do some things and for other things I depend on help but I easily adapt to new situations. I used prosthetic legs to get around but you can also find me in a wheelchair, on a skateboard or simply walking on my hands on the ground. Whatever is needed for the task. I do not really think about it, I just live. If you really want to be happy, work hard for it, you will get there and you will realize that you will only be able to find this place inside yourself. Be yourself, believe in yourself and trust yourself. We are all individuals but we are also all connected on this beautiful planet we call earth. Life is good and if you feel it isn't, make it good!

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“I think it is important that people start seeing beauty not as a concept but as something which can be seen in all of us. I do realize that seeing a woman with only half a body, seeing scars, leg stumps and deformed hands is not considered beautiful. But this isn’t the point, beauty lies in the fact that me and thousands of other people out there do not hide their weaknesses but show that this is nothing to be ashamed about. Beauty does not lie in scars or missing limbs but in the self confidence to be able to show these scars and be happy with who you are in this world.”

6. Maylan Chavez

Hi! I'm Maylan Chavez, I'm 22 years old and from Miami, FL. I'm a student, patient, daughter, fiancee, and friend to all. As a disabled woman of 22 years, I've faced more struggles than most others ever should. I grew up in a world just not built for me, and constantly broke any barrier put in my path. Thanks to my parents who never imposed limits on me, I learned to be strong even when all else told me otherwise. Through school, friendships, relationships, family, travel, and interaction, I've risen above the known stigmas, and it was as easy as accepting who I am. I love me for me, and my most important lesson was learning that disability is not an obstacle, but rather a different way of living life. I constantly remind myself of my one, absolute truth: happiness is a choice. You must choose to be happy. Proactively, unequivocally, unfalteringly — happy. And though it will always be easier to be anything but, being happy is the only choice that is worth it. I promise you. Be happy in the face of adversity, and the sun will always shine again. If you are disabled like me, please remember there's nothing you can't do. And if you aren't, please remember that we all share this experience called life, and there is never any difference between you or any other human being. But please, above all, never let anyone, from a person to society, impose their views on you. Be all that you love yourself for, unapologetically. Always.

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“Be happy in the face of adversity, and the sun will always shine again. If you are disabled like me, please remember there’s nothing you can’t do. And if you aren’t, please remember that we all share this experience called life, and there is never any difference between you or any other human being.”


These are just a few of the incredibly empowering stories, but with every photo comes words from REAL women, shedding light on their real experiences, challenges, battles, fights, and successes.

What impresses me the most about this account, and the main website, You Run Like A Girl is the vulnerability and openness these women share with the world. Not only are they being transparent about their imperfections, but they’re acknowledging their humanness and ways they’ve overcome obstacles in their lives. They don’t see themselves as less, simply because of the things they face – in fact, it’s the opposite – their differences/complications/challenges/setbacks have empowered them to exceed limits and reach farther than they ever imagined.

Stumbling across this site was just another reminder that as women, we must take pride in being ‘like a girl.’ Instead of seeing that phrase as an insult, let’s see it as an inspiration.

We are women. Powerful women. Resilient women.
Bold women. Fearless women. Successful women.

Women that break stereotypes and expectations every single day.

Read more: https://thoughtcatalog.com/marisa-donnelly/2017/12/this-you-run-like-a-girl-instagram-account-is-the-encouragement-and-love-every-woman-needs/